Chislehurst Methodist Church Labyrinth

Built in the Early English Style, Chislehurst Methodist Church was opened in 1870 and has recently been updated to better serve the needs of a 21st century congregation and the wider community. Installation by The Labyrinth Builders of a labyrinth set in a new tiled floor surface forms an important element of the newly refurbished church.

The Original Abingdon Labyrinth Illustration
The original water labyrinth in Damascus
This very unusual design is taken from a water labyrinth in the Qasr al-Azm palace in Damascus, Syria and dates from around 1750 . The original design was adapted by Jeff Saward in order to create a more balanced labyrinth that would sit well within this church setting. In common with the original it features separate paths for the inward and outward journeys. This rendering also has enlarged spaces between each turn to allow for the setting out of prayer stations.

 

Labyrinth Facts

Design Jeff Saward (based on a water labyrinth in the Qasr al-Azm Palace in Damascus)
Construction The Labyrinth Builders, August 2011
Style Non archetypal design with separate entrance and exit paths
Circuits 6
Diameter 6.92m (7.68m including surround)
Distance to the centre 74.5m (entrance to exit)
Paths 306mm wide formed by 75mm square tiles.
Number of tiles 8000
Walls 76mm wide formed by a single course of square tiles

 

 

Mouse over for larger images

The Chislehurst Methodist Church labyrinth
The Chislehurst Methodist Church labyrinth

The labyrinth has separate inward and outward paths
The labyrinth has separate inward and outward paths

European circle dancing on the labyrinth
European circle dancing on the labyrinth

‘Worms eye’ labyrinth view
‘Worms eye’ labyrinth view

 
The Chislehurst Methodist Church labyrinth
The labyrinth has separate inward and outward paths
European circle dancing on the labyrinth
‘Worms eye’ labyrinth view